Solutions to Water Threats in an Era of Global Change

Global Water Futures is a University of Saskatchewan-led research program that is funded in part by a $77.8-million grant from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. The overarching goal of the program is to deliver risk management solutions - informed by leading-edge water science and supported by innovative decision-making tools - to manage water futures in Canada and other cold regions where global warming is changing landscapes, ecosystems, and the water environment. Global Water Futures (GWF) aims to position Canada as a global leader in water science for cold regions and will address the strategic needs of the Canadian economy in adapting to change and managing risks of uncertain water futures and extreme events. End-user needs will be our beacon and will drive strategy and shape our science.

Welcome to the beta version of the new GWF site! We are working hard to actively improve this site in the months ahead, and we welcome any feedback you can offer. Please email giws_web@usask.ca with any concerns or suggestions you may have.

Core Partners

University of Saskatchewan
University of Waterloo
McMaster University
Wilfrid Laurier University

Featured Science Outcomes

Climate, Community and Indigenous Resilience

The Kaswentha, or Two Row Wampum Treaty, was originally created in the 17th century to document  an agreement between the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and Dutch Settlers
By: Dawn Martin-Hill, Tariq Deen, Nidhi Nagabhatla, Altaf Arain, Colin Gibson, Kathryn Chen

How water stress impacts planning a climate secure future.

Estimating Soil Moisture Using Drones

Image of drone
By: Yusof Ghiasi, Claude Duguay, Armaghan Salehian, Justin Murfitt

Efficient and accurate estimations of soil moisture are key for proper crop irrigation management.

Water Security for Canadians

The Global Water Futures program and partners are convening national discussions on the future of water security in Canada, including the water management issues, capabilities, advances and needs, to help inform the federal government in its development of the Canada Water Agency.

Recent News

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The Conversation Canada

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Curated by professionals, the Conversation Canada is an independent source of news and views delivered directly to the public. The articles below are authored by faculty and students, involved in the Global Water Futures community.

Extreme precipitation events have always occurred, but are they changing?

Francis Zwiers - University of Victoria, Ronald Stewart - University of Manitoba

Extreme weather and climate events causing extensive damage are a fact of the Canadian climate, and this year is no exception.


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Northern fish are tough, but climate change is causing some to dwindle

Alyssa MurdochYork UniversityChrystal Mantyka-PringleUniversity of Saskatchewan, and Sapna SharmaYork University

The survival tools these fish have used for millennia — exceptional tolerance to cold, slow growth rates and long lifespans — could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions in the north warm and more fast-paced species move in.


Upcoming Events

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Projects

 


 

GWF is led by the Global Institute for Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan in partnership with University of Waterloo, McMaster University and Wilfrid Laurier University. 

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University of Saskatechewan logo
University of Waterloo logo
McMaster University logo
Wilfrid Laurier University logo